Portrait of dorian gray sparknotes. The Picture of Dorian Gray Chapter 11 Summary & Analysis 2022-10-20

Portrait of dorian gray sparknotes Rating: 6,3/10 1351 reviews

The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel by Oscar Wilde that was first published in 1890. It tells the story of Dorian Gray, a handsome young man who becomes obsessed with his own beauty and youth.

The novel begins with Dorian meeting the artist Basil Hallward, who is painting a portrait of him. Dorian becomes infatuated with the painting and wishes that he could remain young and beautiful forever, while the portrait ages in his place. A friend of Dorian's, Lord Henry Wotton, encourages him to embrace his youth and beauty and to seek pleasure and gratification at all costs.

Dorian decides to follow Lord Henry's advice and embarks on a life of indulgence and hedonism. He becomes increasingly selfish and cruel, and his actions have a corrupting influence on those around him. As he grows older, Dorian remains young and beautiful, while the portrait hidden in his attic becomes increasingly grotesque and ugly.

Despite the consequences of his actions, Dorian remains unwilling to change his ways until it is too late. He finally realizes the error of his ways when he murders Basil, who has discovered the secret of the portrait, and is tormented by guilt and remorse. Dorian ultimately destroys the portrait, which causes his own death and the restoration of the portrait to its original, youthful form.

The Picture of Dorian Gray is a cautionary tale about the dangers of vanity and the pursuit of pleasure at the expense of morality. It explores the themes of youth, beauty, and the corrupting influence of power and wealth. Through the character of Dorian Gray, Wilde critiques the shallow and superficial values of Victorian society and the consequences of living a life devoid of meaning and purpose.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their good intellects. Combining elements of the Gothic horror novel and decadent French fiction, the book centers on a striking premise: As Dorian Gray sinks into a life of crime and gross sensuality, his body retains perfect youth and vigor while his recently painted portrait grows day by day into a hideous record of evil, which he must keep hidden from the world. To look one way and act another is ruinou possibly how we have an image of ourselves which we try to preserve, but its is our actions that defines us. He fears that the painting will reveal the secret of his soul. Dorian feels even more guilty and cursed, but wishes to make one final stab at having a good and worthwhile life. Dorian is annoyed with Sybil and tells her that he cannot see her anymore.


Next

The Picture of Dorian Gray Chapter Summaries

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

Dorian grimly leads Basil up to the old school room to look upon his handiwork for the first time in eighteen years. Once his wife leaves Henry talks dismissively of marriage. Chapter 1 also introduces some of the major themes of the novel: the importance and power of beauty in relation to the intellect and the soul, and the fleeting nature of beauty. His virtues are not real to him. Then, in a few short pages, he becomes a disgusted critic, a heartless deserter, briefly a contrite sinner, and then finally a lover rededicated to Sibyl — not because he loves the woman, but because he fears hurting himself and the portrait. And isn't that just the way it always goes? The members of these two groups could not be more different, and Wilde uses the differences to foreshadow Sibyl's downfall.

Next

Chapter 7

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

Isaacs manages the theater whereDorian falls for Sibyl Vane. . Nothing remains then but the recollection of a pleasure, or the luxury of a regret. Her love for Dorian, however, reveals the artificiality of her theatrical career and she is no longer able to act. Since then he's gone to the theater to watch her in different roles.

Next

The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945)

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

Dorian's response is cold and filled with disgust: "You have killed my love," he mutters. The gods spoke through them. Still, Lord Henry is the Wildean character in this novel: bright, witty, and controlling. You can thank me later. Henry shares the news that Dorian is engaged.

Next

The Picture of Dorian Gray: Dorian Gray

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

The mutilation of the savage has its tragic survival in the self-denial that mars our lives. This book is exquisite; it is an investigation into the human soul, the power of vanity and the problems of living a life with not a single consequence for your actions. . Of course they are charitable. Dorian wanders the streets until near dawn and then returns home. He never returned to Ireland or Britain, and died in poverty. This shows Dorian's power in general and the novel's homoerotic tendencies more specifically.

Next

The Picture of Dorian Gray Chapter 11 Summary & Analysis

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

I love this quote: "But beauty, real beauty, ends where an intellectual expression begins. How clear, and vivid, and cruel! The body sins once, and has done with its sins, for action is a mode of purification. Henry sent the evening paper over: it includes the results of the inquest into Sibyl's death. I really rather enjoyed this. There is a soul in each one of us. Vane is the impoverished and shallow mother of James and Sibyl Vane.

Next

Grade 12 English Picture of Dorian Gray Study Guide

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

He goes on to say that "the important thing" is "one's own life" and that the lives of others are of no concern. He's nervous but appears ca. A distinct turning point in the chapter is Henry's gift of a "yellow book. It's nearly nine before he meets Henry at the club for dinner. Enraged, James Vane begins to track down Dorian Gray. Wilde delves into the cartesian dualist debate, asking us to question where the self truly does reside and contradicting the popular Victorian idea of physiognomy. She explains that, knowing nothing of life and love, she had wholeheartedly believed in the truth—the emotions—of each role she performed.

Next

Chapter 1

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

The men seem to disagree, but both arguments are true. James also worries about Sibyl because he's about to leave the country to seek his fortune. The aim of life is self-development. Hetty Merton Hetty Merton is the young woman Dorian romances but decides not to seduce as part of his effort to change late in the novel. But their own souls starve, and are naked. Dorian watches the rest of the play.


Next

The Picture of Dorian Gray Chapters Three

portrait of dorian gray sparknotes

This story read somewhat like a dark, corrupted Jane Austen in that the writing was snappy and pleasant on the ear, but the feeling it left you with was one of hopelessness and despair. It shouldn't have any more effect on the world than anything Basil or Henry say in Chapter 1. Henry and Basil go with him to a Dorian has the portrait removed to his attic. They have forgotten the highest of all duties, the duty that one owes to one's self. In the greenroom after the play is finished, Sibyl seems overjoyed at her dismal performance and expects Dorian to understand that she can no longer act because she has found true love in real life.

Next