The collar george herbert analysis. A Short Analysis of George Herbert’s ‘The Collar’ 2022-10-08

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"The Collar" by George Herbert is a poem that explores the theme of individual freedom and the struggle against societal expectations and constraints.

In the poem, Herbert presents the image of a collar as a metaphor for the various constraints and expectations that society places upon an individual. The collar represents the burden of these expectations, which can be suffocating and oppressive. The speaker in the poem is struggling against this collar, trying to assert their own individuality and freedom.

One of the main themes in the poem is the idea that society can be restrictive and oppressive, especially when it comes to expectations of how one should behave and what one should do with their life. The collar represents the weight of these expectations and the ways in which they can limit an individual's freedom.

Another theme in the poem is the idea of resistance and the struggle for freedom. The speaker in the poem is fighting against the collar, trying to break free from the constraints that society has placed upon them. This can be seen in lines such as "I struck the board, and cried, 'No more! / I will abroad!'" and "I lost a other world, and now / I am myself, and cannot get it."

Despite the speaker's struggle, the poem also touches on the idea that there may be some benefits to conforming to societal expectations. The speaker notes that there are "gains, by obedient trailing" and that the collar can also offer some protection and security. However, these benefits are ultimately overshadowed by the loss of individual freedom and self-expression.

In conclusion, "The Collar" by George Herbert is a thought-provoking poem that explores the theme of individual freedom and the struggle against societal expectations and constraints. Through the use of the collar as a metaphor, Herbert presents the idea that society can be restrictive and oppressive, but that there is also value in resistance and the fight for freedom.

The Collar: Poem, Summary, Themes & Quotes

the collar george herbert analysis

If Herbert all out denies the existence of God, then the chain of restrictions he is challenging is a non-existent. Forsake thy cage, Thy rope of sands, Which pettie thoughts have made, and made to thee Good cable, to enforce and draw, And be thy law, While thou didst wink and wouldst not see. The speaker suddenly begins to rave, flying into a mad state of anger. Male 8, Nun O A busy B. The second stanza takes on more personal notes and the poet questions whether he being a priest does not deserve any reward. Forsake thy cage, UX UX UX UX UX Thy rope of sands, UX UX Which petty thoughts have made, and made to thee UX UX UX UX UX Good cable, to enforce and draw, UX UX UX UX And be thy law, UX UX While thou didst wink and wouldst not see. Not so, my heart; but there is fruit, 18.

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"The Collar" by George Herbert

the collar george herbert analysis

. The speaker suddenly hears a voice call, "Child! Taylor and trace developments in management thought in Great Britain, Europe, Japan, and the U. The Collar I struck the board, and cried, "No more; I will abroad! XU UX UX UX Shall I be still in suit? No the poet feels that he has neglected his life not to enjoy the worldly pleasure. In line thirteen, the speaker wonders, ". George Herbert reflected this lack of organization with The Collar because this poem is very much like a teenage rant.

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The Collar Summary

the collar george herbert analysis

The speaker then decides to abandon this state of pining and misery, to no longer worry about living a pious life. Hutchinson Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964 15354. Herbert, we should add, was a priest himself. Not so, my heart; but there is fruit, And thou hast hands. Wipf and Stock Publishers.

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The Collar “The Collar” Summary and Analysis

the collar george herbert analysis

So, he will break the collar and will enjoy every pleasure doubled as he had not enjoyed it in his young age. But as I raved and grew more fierce and wild. The lamentation continues in the third stanza as well. The speaker no longer seems concerned with being The line, "While thou didst wink and wouldst not see" may connect to the Bible verse, "Who winks with their eye is plotting perversity; whoever purses their lips is bent on evil. Stueart and Barbara B. His furious self-reflection comes to a crescendo "fierce and wild" but is halted abruptly. For more see the detailed annotations.

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George Herbert

the collar george herbert analysis

He is declaring that there is a whole world beyond the life he's currently living and much to experience. This is best seen in the rhyme scheme. Number of colleges are scattered across the country where thousands of students who dare study in English are gasping for breaths. D D Have I no harvest but a thorn E E To let me bloud, and not restore A A What I have lost with cordiall fruit? His "sighs" and "tears" have made him ruin the fruits of his labors. My lines and life are free; free as the rode, Loose as the winde, as large as store.

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'The Collar' by George Herbert

the collar george herbert analysis

It is also bent around the neck of a dog so that it can be loyal to its master. XX UX UX UX My lines and life are free, free as the road, UX UX UX XU UX Loose as the wind, as large as store. This is first indicated by the poem title; a collar is the most recognizable article of clothing worn by a priest or clergyman. I struck the board, and cried, "No more; 2. The speaker declares, "My lines and life are free, free as the road, loose as the wind. Phallic and pudendal humor lurks here. Impatient with his condition, he therefore, resolves to break free.

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The Collar Poem Summary and Analysis

the collar george herbert analysis

The Works of George Herbert, ed. One of his more famous examples of this was "The Altar" in which the text is printed to resemble a literal church altar. Actually, here the collar means the rules of religion that stop people from doing bad works and enjoy any kind of material pleasure. UX UX UX U Is the year only lost to me? Shall I be still in suit? Ultimately, The Collar shows us that even saints might feel self-pity, but they're also the ones who eventually get over themselves and continue to heed the call. Nostalgia is hardwired into the human psyche and the priest is no different, lamenting the loss of days gone by. He has arrived at a crisis of the spirit, unsure of his spiritualism and resentful of the religious confines in which he has lived and served.


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George Herbert The Collar Analysis

the collar george herbert analysis

Shall I be still in suit? Have I no harvest but a thorn To let me blood, and not restore What I have lost with cordial fruit? Is the year only lost to me? It begins abruptly, with a display of seemingly unfounded aggression. A collar, after all, is a restrictive garment, often a symbol of ownership. On double pleasures: leave thy cold dispute 21. From the very beginning, the poetic narrator of The Collar is full of self-pity over the lack of satisfaction he gets from his occupation as a clergyman, which is represented by the article clothing named in the poem's title. Not so, my heart: but there is fruit, And thou hast hands.

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