Adjective subordinate clause. How to use adjective clause? Explained by FAQ Blog 2022-10-22

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An adjective subordinate clause, also known as an adjective clause or relative clause, is a clause that functions as an adjective in a sentence by modifying a noun or pronoun. Adjective clauses are introduced by a relative pronoun, such as "who," "whom," "whose," "that," or "which," and they provide additional information about the noun or pronoun.

For example, in the sentence "The boy who I saw at the park is my neighbor," the adjective clause "who I saw at the park" modifies the noun "boy" and tells us more about the specific boy being referred to. Similarly, in the sentence "The book which I read last night was very interesting," the adjective clause "which I read last night" modifies the noun "book" and gives us more information about the specific book being referred to.

Adjective clauses are essential for providing clarity and specificity in writing and speech. Without them, sentences can become ambiguous and confusing, as it can be difficult to determine which noun or pronoun is being modified. For example, consider the sentence "The woman I saw at the store was wearing a red dress." Without an adjective clause, it is not clear which woman is being referred to. However, with the addition of an adjective clause, such as "The woman who I saw at the store was wearing a red dress," the sentence becomes much clearer and more specific.

In addition to providing clarity and specificity, adjective clauses can also add depth and complexity to a sentence by offering further information about the noun or pronoun being modified. For example, the sentence "The movie that I watched last night was very suspenseful" not only tells us which movie was watched, but also provides additional information about the movie's content.

In summary, adjective subordinate clauses are an important grammatical construct that provide additional information about a noun or pronoun in a sentence. They help to clarify and specify the noun or pronoun being modified, and can also add depth and complexity to a sentence by offering further information about it.

All About Adjective Clauses and Relative Clauses

adjective subordinate clause

Poor Joe—but hey, applause to him for trying! Subordinate clauses are started with a relative pronoun or a subordinating conjuction. There is only one adverb clause per sentence. Fusce dui lectus, congue vel laoreet ac, dictum vitae odio. Here the which clause provides added, but not essential, information, and so we set it off from the rest of the sentence with commas. Nam lacinia pulvinar tortor nec facilisis. If you removed the relative clauses, the meanings of their respective sentences could be unclear or would change entirely. Without it, we don't know which tramp we're talking about.

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Types of Subordinate Clause

adjective subordinate clause

Identifying Adverb Clauses Notice that each adverb clause below marked in bold begins with a subordinating conjunction and provides information related to the why, when, where, degree, or conditions of another part of the sentence. Donec gue gue gue gue gue gue amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. » Students are scoring higher than ever before, which is a good thing. Like an adverb, it modifies a verb, an adjective clause, or another adverb clause in the sentence. As shown here, the adjective clause does the job of an father. Some common subordinating conjunctions are because, since, if, whenever, even if, until, while, as long as, and though.

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Adjective Clauses in Grammar

adjective subordinate clause

A subordinate clause is defined as a clause that cannot stand on its own. This lesson will continue to discuss the subordinate clause definition, subordinate clause examples, and different types of subordinate clauses. Eat junk food when? This trick works because that can only be used with a restrictive clause, and — whether you consciously know it or not — some language-processing area of your brain does. As a modifier, it gives more information about a verb of the main clause in terms of time, frequency i. They are separated by a comma, and if they were removed, a complete thought would still remain.

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Subordinate Clause: Examples

adjective subordinate clause

This is why it is a kind of adjective. Nonrestrictive: My favorite artist is van Gogh, who was a tortured genius. Punctuating Subordinate Clauses Introductory subordinate clauses can be punctuated by adding a comma after the dependent clause starting the sentence. They can be used make a final sentence more detailed or even answer a question in incomplete-sentence form. » That blue boat is old. How to Use Subordinate Clauses in Sentences There are three types of subordinate clauses: adverb, noun, and adjective.

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Subordinate Clause: Explanation and Examples

adjective subordinate clause

Before you eat fast food, you might want to stop and consider its fat content. Subordinate clauses may also begin with a relative pronoun, such as whoever, whenever, or wherever. The answer is sometimes yes and sometimes no. Nam risus ante, dapibus a molestie ac, dictum vitae odio. Restrictive Clause versus Non-restrictive Clause Restrictive clauses are dependent clauses that do not need a comma. Adjective Clauses: Restrictive and Nonrestrictive We have two fundamental adjective clause categories: 1 restrictive and 2 nonrestrictive. This means we may need to rearrange the words to see things clearly.

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Adjective and Adverb Clauses: Differences and Uses

adjective subordinate clause

A dependent clause is a phrase that can't stand on its own as a complete sentence. My favorite book is Song of Solomon, which skillfully combines realism and fantasy. In simple words, subordinate or dependent clauses are those that cannot stand alone in a sentence. Noun clauses: Noun clauses are the type of dependent clauses that basically act as nouns in a sentence. A dependent clause, or subordinate clause, can function in three ways in a sentence: as a noun, as an adjective, or as an adverb.


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[Solved] Grammar

adjective subordinate clause

Define adjective clause: The definition of adjective clause is a group of words with a subject and verb that provide a description. The students whose grades improved received an award. Origin of Subordinate The word subordinate originated in the mid-1500s from the Latin word subordinatus, meaning ''having an inferior rank. Restrictive: There was a time when I thought that, too. Similarly, in this adjective clause example, the adjective clause describes concert attendees. An independent clause can stand alone as a simple sentence.

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Subordinate Clauses

adjective subordinate clause

Question 1 Should I use a comma before which? Charlie wants to go back to France, where he fell in love with art. A noun clause is a dependent clause that acts as a noun. L at, ultrices ac magna. » The front runner tripped and fell, which helped Jenson to record his first victory. Substituting low-fat ingredients is simple when you know a few tricks. Thankfully, subordinate clauses can help. The workers must replace the fence that they tore down.

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Subordinate Clause: Definition, Types, and Examples

adjective subordinate clause

As you can see, the adjective clause is underlined, and the noun that it modifies is in bold. This clause is not required to identify My brother. Nonrestrictive: I believe the claim, which Jim also believes. Relative Pronouns: who, which, that, whom, whose 2. Notice how they could all be standalone sentences.

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