Frost on satire. Frost on Satire 2022-10-20

Frost on satire Rating: 8,9/10 1978 reviews

Robert Frost is perhaps best known for his poignant and evocative nature poetry, which often explores themes of solitude, loss, and the beauty of the natural world. However, Frost was also a master of satire, using his sharp wit and keen eye for human foibles to skewer the follies and absurdities of modern life.

One of Frost's most famous satirical poems is "Mending Wall," which is a subtle yet powerful critique of the barriers that people put up between themselves and others. In this poem, Frost muses on the annual spring ritual of repairing a stone wall that divides his property from his neighbor's. While the neighbor insists on maintaining the wall, Frost wonders why it is necessary, and suggests that it is a futile and meaningless task. He writes:

Something there is that doesn't love a wall, That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it, And spills the upper boulders in the sun; And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.

Through this simple imagery, Frost suggests that the wall is not only an artificial and unnecessary division, but that it is also constantly being undermined by the forces of nature. The wall is a metaphor for the barriers that people put up between themselves and others, whether they be physical walls, social barriers, or psychological divisions.

Frost's use of satire in "Mending Wall" is subtle and understated, but it is no less effective for being so. By presenting the wall as a nonsensical and futile task, Frost is able to draw attention to the ways in which people often create unnecessary divisions and barriers between themselves and others. His wit and insight into human nature make this poem a classic example of Frost's satirical genius.

Another example of Frost's satirical skills can be found in his poem "The Road Not Taken," which is often read as a celebration of individualism and nonconformity. However, upon closer examination, the poem can also be seen as a biting critique of the way in which people often romanticize the idea of going against the grain. Frost writes:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and Iā€” I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.

While this passage is often cited as an inspiring call to embrace one's individuality, it can also be read as a tongue-in-cheek comment on the way in which people often glorify the idea of being different, even when the choices they make are not particularly significant or meaningful. By presenting the decision to take the less-traveled road as a momentous choice that has had a profound impact on the speaker's life, Frost is able to poke fun at the way in which people often exaggerate the importance of their own choices and actions.

In conclusion, Robert Frost was a master of satire, using his sharp wit and keen eye for human foibles to skewer the absurdities and follies of modern life. Through his subtle and understated use of irony and symbolism, Frost was able to draw attention to the ways in which people often put up unnecessary barriers between themselves and others, and to the way in which they often romanticize the idea of going against the grain. His satirical poems continue to be enjoyed and admired by readers around the world.

David Frost's Q&A on how to be a satirist

frost on satire

Others, especially in America, think differently. They said I wasn't up to the job, I'm not. What you want to do? All of them tackle the key question of whether satire really can alter the course of political events. One day it may even go forwards. Frost satirizes the idea that, if one holds on to a certain belief persistently enough, it is sure to become a creed.

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Frost on Satire

frost on satire

If you're a Danish cartoonist 0:56:15 0:56:18 and you work within a Western tradition, if you like, the tradition we have 0:56:18 0:56:23 in this country that you don't take things too seriously, 0:56:23 0:56:26 and suddenly you are confronted with a group of people 0:56:26 0:56:29 who are fundamentalist and extreme, and they say, "We are going to kill you for what you've written, 0:56:29 0:56:37 "for what you have drawn," you're in a very chilling reality. David Frost presents an investigation into the power of political satire with the help of some of the funniest TV moments of the last 50 years. I don't know that. I n November 1962, when I was recently down from Cambridge, I landed the graduate's dream job, devising and hosting a show on It was almost literally an overnight success. . Get back over there. Satire needs targets and the plight of the Spitting Image team reflected a nationwide crisis in comedy.

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Etherealizing: by Robert Frost

frost on satire

He said: "When I left Spitting Image after the first four years I certainly felt that we'd achieved nothing but possibly make the government slightly more powerful than it was when we'd found it. The public moan, moan, moan. We would have been 'etherealized', turned into pure abstractions. Former Governor Palin has a very distinct accent, 0:39:13 0:39:19 and she had a very folksy way of speaking. How soon before I can start making people laugh? Will I need a sense of humour? As Sir David pottered through the subsequent decades, highlighting satirical milestones such as Saturday Night and Spitting Image's producer, John Lloyd. This, perhaps, will be the last stale of the evolutionary process.

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Frost on Satire (TV Movie 2010)

frost on satire

Remarkably, the most provocative moments in Sir David Frost's survey of TV satire were supplied by his own early-Sixties show, That Was The Week That Was, when he was still an oily young upstart on the make. I think satire changes perceptions, 0:24:07 0:24:13 but I don't think it changes the actuality. At a time of rising unemployment it must ensure that there are job opportunities galore for novice satirists. The BBC's Director General himself had declared that the aim of the show was to "prick the pomposity of public figures", but he must have felt the shockwaves rattling the door of his office. The brain might lie on the beach letting the waves wash over it. Could satire change the world or not, enquired Frost. There was a time in the evolutionary process, at the very beginning, when life was a blob of jellyfish; now it may develop and become a mere brain.

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Frost on Satire, BBC Four

frost on satire

From my first day at the BBC, I could see that my Cambridge Footlights-honed sense of humour was going to stand me in good stead. You can either write satire about the issues or about the personalities. There are people who regard the body as superfluous and the mind alone is essential. This stuff would be staggering now, let alone in stuffy, uptight, monochrome 1962, but these days shock and awe are left to the military. I'd much rather go too far 0:55:04 0:55:08 and take my lumps for it, than not go far enough and have people call me soft. And we would then be completely useless.

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Frost on Satire

frost on satire

Their key target ā€” Margaret Thatcher ā€” resigned and the satire boom burst audibly. Get yourself a strategy. Get out of there! The way Rory Bremner was the first satirist to find cracks in the gleaming facade of Teflon Tony Blair was hailed as a triumph, but ultimately it was Blair's own greed and messianic delusions that brought him down, rather than some clever sketches on television. John Lloyd, one of the creators of the long-running Spitting Image, told me that satire "may change perceptions but it doesn't actually change the actuality". Ironically, in the mean time, a satirical boom was being born in America.

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frost on satire

It's not the press's fault, is it? And breathing down the necks of the established late night hosts are the new kids on the block, the internet satire sources such as By comparison British satire looks quiescent ā€” though no one watching some episodes of BBC2's Mock the Week could ever accuse it of not still being red in tooth and claw. But most satirists want something more: they want to change the world ā€” and that normally takes a bit longer. It can happen almost immediately. They're the ones who went ahead and change their minds without telling anyone. Lorne pulled that out at the very last minute before the show. So can you remember any of the jokes from any of the early episodes of That Was the Week That Was? And to help them, there are plenty of veteran satirists who are ready to share their hard-won knowledge of the trade. As Thatcher stepped down here, the George W Bush administration ā€” the gift that keeps on giving ā€” dropped into the laps of US funnymen.

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frost on satire

What a shame that so few of the latter are capable of feeling shame or remorse. . It was almost as bad as the confession from a benign, roly-poly Chevy Chase that while he was willing to lampoon politicians, he hated the idea that they might actually feel personally wounded by his comic barbs. Nonetheless we're much better off with satirists than without them and, if nothing else, satire will always have a role as a lightning rod for shared disgust, anger or contempt at the behaviour of our public representatives. What we need is a comedy coalition to monitor our so-called "new politics".

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