Sonnet 94. Sonnet Commentaries 94 2022-10-24

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Sonnet 94 is a poem written by William Shakespeare in the 16th century. It is part of the Fair Youth sequence, a group of sonnets that are addressed to a young man who is the object of the speaker's affection. In this particular sonnet, the speaker reflects on the fleeting nature of time and the way in which it can change the appearance and experiences of a person.

The poem begins with the speaker stating that time is a "fickle wight" or fickle creature. Time is often portrayed as a force that is beyond our control, and it is depicted as being unpredictable and capricious in this sonnet. The speaker goes on to say that time can "wrinkle" or age the skin, causing a person to lose their youthful appearance. This serves as a reminder that time is constantly moving forward and that we are all subject to its passage.

The speaker then turns to the way in which time can affect our experiences and memories. They state that time can "wipe" or erase the memories of a person's youth, causing them to forget the joys and sorrows of their younger years. This line suggests that as we get older, our memories of the past become less vivid and less emotionally charged.

The final two lines of the sonnet offer a glimmer of hope, as the speaker suggests that despite the ravages of time, there is still a way to preserve the memories of our youth. They state that by writing poetry, we can create a "chronicle" or record of our experiences that will allow us to remember them even as time moves on. This suggests that the act of writing poetry is a way to freeze time, if only in our own minds, and to keep the memories of our youth alive.

In conclusion, Sonnet 94 is a poignant reflection on the way in which time can change the appearance and experiences of a person. The speaker suggests that time is a fickle creature that can age and erase our memories, but that by writing poetry we can create a record of our experiences that will allow us to remember them even as time moves on.

Sonnet 94 Themes

sonnet 94

His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. The beauteous youth, or any seeming ideal, has both faults and graces. Shakespeare, even as an acclaimed poet, knows his writing cannot logically substitute for the life force of the youth. For whether we live, we live unto the Lord: or whether we die we die unto the Lord. In other words, when something is in its perfect form and falls for one reason or another, it is more tragic, more corrupt, than any other kind of fall. Our love was new, and then but in the spring, When I was wont to greet it with my lays, As Philomel in summer's front doth sing, And stops his pipe in growth of riper days: Not that the summer is less pleasant now Than when her mournful hymns did hush the night, But that wild music burthens every bow, And sweets grown common lose their dear delight. The Muse then occurs 5 times in the 9 alien Poet sonnets where the youth is further encouraged to mature his understanding.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 94 Summary & Analysis

sonnet 94

For fear of which, hear this thou age unbred, Ere you were born was beauty's summer dead. The stoic state allows these beautiful people to resist temptation. Sonnet 95 How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame, Which like a canker in the fragrant Rose, Doth spot the beauty of thy budding name? In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights. With his eyes, the Poet reads the eyes of the youth, or reads his own eyes as if in a youthful mirror 104. But if that flower meets a disgusting infection , The lowliest weed surpasses its dignity.

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Sonnet 94 Full Text and Analysis

sonnet 94

In contrast are those whose beauty not only tempts but also leads them into temptation. Sonnet 97 is one of many that prove they prejudge the meaning of the Sonnets. The speaker, genuinely in love with the young man, is forced to relate to him not as an equal, but as an inferior. It is sweet to the physical systems on earth but rotten in the eyes of God. Sonnet 98 revisits the seasonal imagery of winter and spring from sonnet 97. Take heed dear heart of this large privilege, The hardest knife ill used doth lose his edge.

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No Fear Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 94

sonnet 94

Because human beings would cease to exist without increase, truth and beauty derive their logical dynamic from increase. See eNotes Ad-Free Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts. In the second quatrain, the "they" ironically pictures a youth who has a stingy, hoarding nature. Which three till now, never kept seat in one. Line 5 necessarily shares a feminine ending.


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Shakespeare's Sonnet 94: They that have pow'r...

sonnet 94

The next three lines of the quatrain elaborate on this quality through a series of restrictive clauses: Though such persons may seem to threaten to act, they do not; they move others to act but are themselves unmoved, show little emotion, and restrain themselves from temptation. Other critics argue that Sonnet 94 is extremely ironic. The Poet recalls sonnets 15 to 19, which state the priority of increase over truth and beauty, and the inability of his poetry to replicate the natural cycle. The 9 Muses of old inspire the inadequate and immature understanding of the youth and the alien Poets, who are associated with the number 9. Kind is my love today, tomorrow kind, Still constant in a wondrous excellence, Therefore my verse to constancy confined, One thing expressing, leaves out difference. What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen? The citation above will include either 2 or 3 dates.

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Sonnet 94

sonnet 94

People who have the power to hurt, but will not do any, Who do not do the thing that they most seem to be doing, Who move others but are themselves like stone , Unmoved, cold, and slow to respond to temptation, They correctly inherit heaven's blessings, And manage nature's riches so that they are not wasted. It also has sexual undertones. Political power that is beneficial to others is achieved by first having power over oneself, having the power to hurt, but having the restraint not to exercise such power. This rhyme scheme effectively divides the poem into three quatrains and a closing couplet, unlike the Italian or Petrarchan sonnet, which tends to be structured as an octave and sestet. As a symbol of the second, the same flower is infected with a canker, in which case it is more offensive than a weed.

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Sonnet 94: They that have power to hurt and will…

sonnet 94

The same qualities are said by some to be faults and by others to be graces. Yet even such superior individuals must remain alert not to fall from perfection if they are to avoid becoming the worst, just as "Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. Initial reversals also appear in lines 1, 8, and 14. In Sonnet 94, the speaker issues a word of caution to the fair youth. Throughout the Sonnets truth is what can be said to be true or false. Unlike beauty, truth is not a sensation. Sonnet 99 uses the imagery and arguments of 98 to make a pointed statement about intellectual piracy.

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Sonnet 94

sonnet 94

Then do thy office Muse, I teach thee how, To make him seem long hence, as he shows now. The couplet reveals why. Commentators miss the connection between Jaggard and sonnet 99. But if that flow'r with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity. In my love's veins thou hast too grossly died, The Lily I condemned for thy hand, And buds of marjoram had stolen thy hair, The Roses fearfully on thorns did stand, Our blushing shame, an other white despair: A third nor red, nor white, had stolen of both, And to his robb'ry had annexed thy breath, But for his theft in pride of all his growth A vengeful canker eat him up to death. Is this the straightforward meaning of Sonnet 94, that attractive people who have ugly personalities — beautiful people who use others and exploit their feelings, for instance — are worse than plain old ugly people who were nothing special to begin with? In sonnet 76, the Poet acknowledged the persistent repetition evident in the Sonnets. Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb? His plays have been tr William Shakespeare baptised 26 April 1564 was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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Sonnet 94 Summary

sonnet 94

Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others. His argument is necessary and persistent because of the tendency of the human mind even more persistently to imagine ideal worlds and then consider them more real than the dynamic of life. Two reasons are given for his power of judgment. Sonnet 98 From you have I been absent in the spring, When proud pied April dressed in all his trim Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing: That heavy Saturn laughed and leapt with him. They inspire sexual desire in those, but are themselves cool and unaffected, and not easily tempted. After all, the word increase is mentioned in line 6. While it is possible to read winter and summer as psychological states of the Poet and youth, in the logic of the Sonnets, winter and summer are metaphors for the advanced years of the Poet and the vitality of the youth.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Sonnet 94

sonnet 94

Yet seemed it Winter still, and you away, As with your shadow I with these did play. But the three-year span can be a period of time in which a young adult does not change significantly in appearance. To him, the young man can often seem cold, distant, and grave, and the speaker, who loves him, is forced to try to explain this behavior in a way that will enable him to continue loving the young man. For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" or simply "The Bard". In his view, beautiful people should not use their beauty to take advantage of others. Sonnet 95 considers beauty, sonnet 96 truth, and sonnet 97 the increase argument.

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