Drakes drum poem. Drake's Drum Quotes 2022-10-28

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Drake's Drum is a poem by Sir Henry Newbolt that tells the legend of a drum belonging to the English naval hero Sir Francis Drake. The poem describes how Drake's drum, which was said to be made from the wood of a sacred tree, had the power to call forth the spirits of England's sailors to defend their country.

According to the legend, the drum was passed down through the generations and was said to beat on its own when England was in danger. The poem describes how the drum's sound could be heard across the land, inspiring English sailors to rise up and defend their country.

The poem celebrates Drake's bravery and patriotism, and serves as a tribute to the courage and determination of all English sailors. It is a tribute to the spirit of England and its people, who have always been willing to stand up and defend their country against threats from abroad.

In the final stanza of the poem, the drum is described as a symbol of the enduring spirit of England, which will continue to beat on long after Drake and his contemporaries are gone. It is a reminder of the country's rich history and its proud traditions, and serves as an inspiration to future generations of English sailors.

Drake's Drum is a powerful and moving tribute to one of England's greatest heroes, and to the spirit of the English people. It is a reminder of the strength and resilience of the human spirit, and serves as a testament to the enduring power of patriotism and loyalty.

41. Drake's Drum. Henry Newbolt. Modern British Poetry

drakes drum poem

The last date is today's date — the date you are citing the material. Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. Call him on the deep sea, call him up the Sound, Call him when ye sail to meet the foe; Where the old trade's plyin' an' the old flag flyin', They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him long ago. Copyrighted poems are the property of the copyright holders. Yet Britain was never a state in terminal decay. Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, Capten, art tha' sleepin' there below? Roving' tho' his An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe.

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Drake's Drum

drakes drum poem

To protect his country in case of attack by the Spanish "Dons," and to protect particularly the Devonshire coast, Drake gives his final orders to his men: "Take my drum to England, hang et by the shore, Strike et when your powder's runnin' low; If the Dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port o' Heaven, An' drum them up the Channel as we drummed them long ago. Call him on the Call him when ye sail to meet the foe; Where the old They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him long ago! All poems are shown free of charge for educational purposes only in accordance with fair use guidelines. Roving' tho' his A' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. British decline in the 20th Century is often seen as something fixed and inevitable. Yarnder lumes the Island, yarnder lie the ships, Wi' sailor lads a-dancing' heel-an'-toe, An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin', He sees et arl so plainly as he saw et long ago. Call him on the deep sea, call him up the Sound, Call him when ye sail to meet the foe; Where the old trade's plyin' an' the old flag flyin' They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him long ago! Drake, he's in his hammock an' a thousand mile away, Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? In relative decline, perhaps, but always a vital entity, one that embraced a process of re—invention; that proved ready to change and adapt its methods, its institutions and its structures. In Newbolt's tribute to the admiral and adventurer, Drake is already dead and buried at sea, but his spirit is alive in the minds of all English seamen: "Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? Drake he's in his hammock an' a thousand miles away, Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? Yarnder lumes the Island, yarnder lie the ships, Wi' sailor lads a-dancin' heel-an'-toe, An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin', He sees et arl so plainly as he saw et long ago.

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Drake's Drum Quotes

drakes drum poem

Whilst the drum dates from the 16th century, the coat of arms that decorates it was added in the 17th century. Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, An' dreamin arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. By registering with PoetryNook. Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, An' dreamin' arl the Yarnder lumes the Wi' sailor lads a-dancing' heel-an'-toe, An' the He sees et arl so plainly as he saw et Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, Capten, art tha' sleepin' there below? Legend has it that in a time of national crisis for Britain, this drum will beat and Drake or his spirit will return to save his country, as he saved them with his victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588. Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, Capten, art tha' sleepin' there below? The drum is also said to mysteriously beat by itself during times of peril.

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Drake's Drum Poem by Sir Henry Newbolt

drakes drum poem

Yonder looms the Island, yonder lie the ships, With sailor-lads a-dancing heel-an'-toe, And the shore-lights flashing, and the night-tide dashing, He sees it all so plainly as he saw it long ago. Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, An' dreamin arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, An' dreamin' arl the time O' Plymouth Hoe. Drake's legendary bravura and cool is captured in the story about the way he greeted the arrival of Spain's formidable Armada, far more powerful than Drake's forces. The second is the date of publication online or last modification online.

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Drake's Drum book

drakes drum poem

Yarnder lumes the island, yarnder lie the ships, 5 Wi' sailor lads a-dancin' heel-an'-toe, An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin' He sees et arl so plainly as he saw et long ago. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, An' dreamin arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. It was acquired by Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery from the family in the 1950s and returned to Buckland Abbey on loan. Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, An' dreamin' arl the time O' Plymouth Hoe. Call him on the deep sea, call him up the Sound, Call him when you sail to meet the foe; Where the old trade's plying and the old flag flying They shall find him ware and waking, as they found him long ago! Drake he's in his hammock an' a thousand miles Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? Call him on the Call him when ye sail to meet the foe; Where the old They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him long ago! Shortly before his death off the coast of Panama in 1596, it is said that he ordered the drum to be taken to Buckland Abbey, his home in Devon.

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Poem: Drake's Drum by Sir Henry John Newbolt

drakes drum poem

Yarnder lumes the Island, yarnder lie the ships, Wi' sailor lads a-dancing' heel-an'-toe, An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin', He sees et arl so plainly as he saw et long ago. Any perceived similarity to any of the people portrayed in this book, be they living or dead, including their actions and the events that occor are entirely coincidental. Com permission to publish the poem. To the Spanish he was a pirate El Draque but to the English, he was a hero. When warned of the Spanish fleet's appearance, Drake was playing bowls on. Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, An' dreamin arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe.

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The Legend of Drake's Drum

drakes drum poem

Slung atween the round shot, listening for the drum, And dreaming all the time of Plymouth Hoe. But what if that re-invention had been driven; not by a romanticised internationalism, or a sense of guilt; but by a pragmatic realism that put the British people and the economic health of the British state at the heart of policy? Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. The second date is today's date — the date you are citing the material. Roving' tho' his death fell, he went wi' heart at ease, A' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. Modern British Poetry CONTENTS· BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD Louis Untermeyer, ed. Line count: 24 Word count: 217 Gentle Reminder This website began in 1995 as a personal project by Emily Ezust, who has been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008.


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Drake's Drum (Sir Henry Newbolt Poems)

drakes drum poem

A highly credible and very detailed exploration of a very plausible scenario. It was first mentioned at Buckland Abbey in an account of traveller George Lipscomb in 1799 and it was at Buckland in 1938 when it was rescued from the fire that beset the Abbey. The citation above will include either 2 or 3 dates. Drake he's in his hammock an' a thousand miles away, Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? Leaves me waiting for more impatiently! Buckland Abbey is in the care of the National Trust. The story hangs together and the Authors attention to detail is unsurpassed. Drake he's in his hammock an' a thousand miles Capten, art tha sleepin' there below? Call him on the deep sea, call him up the Sound, Call him when ye sail to meet the foe; Where the old trade's plyin' an' the old flag flyin' They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him long ago! The drum has now been moved to The Box, in Plymouth.

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